ØKOKRIM prosecutor Linn Eckhoff Dolva (left) and special investigator Sissel Gørrissen (right) were two of the speakers at the anti-corruption conference. Chief prosecutor Anca Jurma moderated the presentations. ØKOKRIM prosecutor Linn Eckhoff Dolva (left) and special investigator Sissel Gørrissen (right) were two of the speakers at the anti-corruption conference. Chief prosecutor Anca Jurma moderated the presentations.

Norwegian and Romanian anti-corruption authorities organize conference on financial crime

30.09.2015 // How can we get our money back? This is the question that experts from Romania, Norway, England, France and Lichtenstein were trying to answer at an anti-corruption conference, this fall. The Romanian National Anticorruption Directorate (DNA) were the hosts together with The Norwegian National Authority for Investigation and Prosecution of Economic and Environmental Crime (ØKOKRIM).

From September 23 to 25, over 50 prosecutors, investigators, judges and anti-corruption experts gathered in Poiana-Brasov under the banner of “Corruption and Financial Crimes. Following the Financial Trail”. The attendees got practical advice on how to conduct transnational financial investigations and a vision of how individual states, like France and Lichtenstein, deal with illicitly acquired assets. The conference also served as an arena for forming bonds and exchanging experiences.

Linn Eckhoff Dolva and Sissel Gørrissen from ØKOKRIM used case studies to highlight the importance of cross border cooperation through mutual legal assistance. ØKOKRIM solved the Yara-case, in which the Norwegian fertilizer-company was found guilty of bribery, through close cooperation with Switzerland and the United States, among others. They also commended the DNA for fruitful cooperation.

Asset recovery, getting illegally acquired money back, is a big challenge in Romania. The authorities only reclaim between 5 and 15 per cent of illicitly acquired assets, according to the European Commission.

The DNA is gaining trust with the Romanian people and the number of solved cases increases every year. In 2014, the directorate registered almost 5000 cases and the same year 335 judgements were rendered in the prosecutions favour, against over 1100 defendants. Reports from the European Commission (CVM-reports) and the Council of Europe point to a positive development in Romania’s anti-corruption work.

Anca Jurma, chief prosecutor of the international cooperation service at the DNA, was responsible for the event, which was funded through the EEA Grants. Romania receives 25.3 million euros for projects in the justice-sector through the Grants. In addition to this, The Norwegian Tax authorities have a close cooperation with their Romanian homologues through a project of 2.4 million euros.

 

For more information, please visit the following links:

Control- and Verification Mechanism (CVM) reports

EEA Grants

The Norwegian National Authority for Investigation and Prosecution of Economic and Environmental Crime, ØKOKRIM

The National Anticorruption Directorate


Bookmark and Share